Seminar Program: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities 2015

The dialog takes place on Tuesdays at 17:00 during the Summer semester (from April 21th until July 14th). The venue of the seminars is to be announced, at the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH). The center’s address is: Heyne-Haus, Papendiek 16, 37073 Göttingen.

As announced in the Call For Papers, the dialogs will take the form of a 45 minute presentation in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Due to logistic and time constraints, the 2015 dialog series will not be video-recorded or live-streamed.  A summary of the talks, together with photographs and, where available, slides, will be uploaded to the GCDH and eTRAP websites. For this reason, presenters are encouraged, but not obligated, to prepare slides to accompany their papers. Please also consider that the €500 award for best paper will be awarded on the basis of both the quality of the paper *and* the delivery of the presentation.

Camera-ready versions of the papers must be sent to Gabriele Kraft at gddh(at)gcdh(dot)de by April 30th. The papers will not be uploaded to the GCDH and eTRAP websites but, as previously announced, published as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). For this reason, papers must be submitted in an editable format (e.g. .docx or LaTeX), not as PDF files.
A small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Everybody is welcome to join in!
If anyone would like to tweet about the dialogs, the Twitter hashtag of this series is #gddh15.
For any questions, do not hesitate to contact gddh(at)gcdh(dot)de.
For further information and updates, visit http://www.gcdh.de/en/events/gottingen-dialog-digital-humanities/.

We look forward to seeing you in Göttingen!

Click the link to view the programme with the locations: GDDH_2015_Poster.

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Article: Is it Research or is it Spying?

Marco’s latest article “Is it Research or is it Spying? Thinking-Through Ethics in Big Data AI and Other Knowledge Sciences” has just been published online! Here is the abstract:

“How to be a knowledge scientist after the Snowden revelations?” is a question we all have to ask as it becomes clear that our work and our students could be involved in the building of an unprecedented surveillance society. In this essay, we argue that this affects all the knowledge sciences such as AI, computational linguistics and the digital humanities. Asking the question calls for dialogue within and across the disciplines. In this article, we will position ourselves with respect to typical stances towards the relationship between (computer) technology and its uses in a surveillance society, and we will look at what we can learn from other fields. We will propose ways of addressing the question in teaching and in research, and conclude with a call to action.

Call for Papers: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities (GDDH) has established a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Social Science, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Tuesday at 5pm from late April until early July 2015 in the form of 90 minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists.

We invite submissions of complete papers describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the Humanities, both in the past and present. Themes may include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data. Papers should be written in English. Successful papers will be submitted for publication as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). Furthermore, the author(s) of the best paper will receive a prize of 500, which will be awarded on the basis of both the quality and the delivery of the paper.

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